Wormsign
ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.



Your honor, something is amiss here!
As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 
Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

Where are the bar codes?!
This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 


Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!


Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—
…! I’ve got it!)
While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 
Well, Edgeworth?



While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.
Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?
Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

(W-wait, but I’m not—)


WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!


As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!
A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!
Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 
The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!
Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!
How’s that for decisive evidence?

ingthing:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

thepurpleeyedone:

beamkatanachronicles:

appleseeddrama:

THEY HAVE THE ACE ATTORNEY OFFICIAL MANGA IN MY LAW LIBRARY I AM CRYING.

image

image

Your honor, something is amiss here!

As you are probably aware, library materials are labeled with barcodes as well as a number to determine their location on the shelf, as per the Dewey Decimal System. The books just to the left of the manga are labeled, as are the DVDs just in view on the lower shelf. Look even further behind these shelves and you’ll see that even those books are labeled! 

Ladies and gentlemen of the courtroom, I invite you to take a closer look at the volumes that are, allegedly, part of this law library! Something is missing from the spines, isn’t there?

image

Where are the bar codes?!

This is a blatant contradiction! The OP is lying— these volumes cannot, therefore, be a part of this library at all! I propose that they simply brought these materials in for the sake of the joke!! 

Only focusing on one aspect and not the whole of the issue, are we, Mr. Wright? Typical.

Your honor, if you bring your attention to the books just left of the manga, you’ll notice there’s a book (the second to the left) that also does not have a bar code.

If you examine the picture even closer—particularly the DVDs below—you’ll see that they bear bar codes, but not on the spines. No, they have them on the back and/or front of the DVDs. Of course, this method of labeling and organizing isn’t limited to products of the film industry alone.

Therefore, I’d like to propose that it is entirely possible that the manga books do, in fact, belong to the library!

image

Wh-WHAAAAT?! You’re kidding!! 

image
(Shoot, he’s got me there… Better think of something fast! Something about the books that sets them apart from—

image
…! I’ve got it!)

While that may be true, you’ve also overlooked one critical error: the titles of the books! Whether or not your hypothesis regarding the labeling system is correct, these titles aren’t alphabetized correctly! What kind of self-respecting librarian would misplace such vital books? 

Well, Edgeworth?

While it pains me to have to point out something so obvious, I suppose I’ll make an exception for you, Wright.

Clearly, one look at the titles of the books next to the manga is a tell-all of this certain library’s less-than-stellar organization skills. None of the books are in alphabetical order, I’m afraid.

They could very well be alphabetized by author and not title, but it’s a little difficult to be able to decipher that from this single picture, wouldn’t you say?

Furthermore, the manga books themselves are in numerical order, suggesting some kind of system is in place, albeit not a very good one, if the alphabetizing is off.

At the end of the day, it seems like neither of us can draw a clear conclusion from this evidence alone. Your honor, I strongly suggest a recess in which we could investigate the library itself further.

I see the issue here very clearly.

image
Due to the uncertain nature of this case, we’ll have to postpone this decision until more decisive evidence can be obtained. The court will now take a 15-minute recess.

image

(W-wait, but I’m not—)

image

WAIT!!!

I’ve got some decisive evidence for you, pal!

We investigated further into the photo. Zooming in, you can see a label on the DVD case to the bottom left.

Photo Close-up added to the court record!

As you can see, pal, you can vaguely see the words “Of Toledo Law Library” on the label!

And, considering possibilities of the rest of that label, “University of Toledo" was the first to come to my mind!

A quick search on the University of Toledo’s Online Law Library Database revealed that there ARE the comics pictured in it!

Miles Edgeworth Ace Attorney Investigations volumes 1-4 and Phoenix Wright Ace Attorney volumes 1-5!

And there’s more! 

The section these comics are filed under is the “Law in Popular Culture" Section, which matches up with the stickers on the rest of the books on that shelf: "Lowering the Bar: Lawyer Jokes & Legal Culture”, “Prime Time Law”, “Lawyers in Your Living Room!" and "Reel Justice: The Courtroom Goes to the Movies”!

Not only is it in the right section, it’s also a documented part of the Law Library’s database!

How’s that for decisive evidence?

sweet-pea-soup:

bestcunt:

cordelias-coriander-condiment:

Who else misses Tumblr before it was this?

Tumblr’s Greatest Hits:Now That’s What I Call Privilege 

http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20131119135357/greecity/images/0/0c/Jontron_kiss.gif

Spring time? More like flower Bukkake time

GypsyMagic: Battle not with sugoi, lest ye become sugoi, for if you stare into the uguu, the uguu stares back into you.
nachalala:

hehehe

nachalala:

hehehe

the-sheeple:

searchforelysium:

fujisalci:

therealdestructables:

I love this.

no matter what you say you cant stop me from shipping starbok x hypster

I miss this.

Would’ve liked sources for a few of those.

imminentdeathsyndrome:

The German term Fremdscham describes a type of proxy-embarrassment; it’s the feeling of shame you have on behalf of others, often those who don’t realize they should be embarrassed for themselves. I can’t think of a term that better applies to the scene that unfolded at the University of Ottawa two weeks ago.
Professor Janice Fiamengo had planned to speak on men’s issues and rape culture as part of a talk organized by the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE). The lecture, called “What’s Equality Got To Do With It? Men’s Issues and Feminism’s Double Standards,” was intended to dispel the notion of rape culture, according to Fiamengo, as well as discuss issues such as suicide by young men and custody rights after divorce. But some student activists decided Fiamengo’s lecture was not appropriate, so they took it upon themselves to shut it down.
The entire display is chronicled in a 50-minute YouTube video that shows protesters booing, yelling and blowing a vuvuzela throughout Fiamengo’s attempted address. The lecture organizer tried to reason with protesters, but it didn’t work. Campus security tried to intervene, with little success. Finally, the event moved to another room, but shortly after, the fire alarm went off.
According to the student newspaper the Fulcrum, a group that calls itself the Revolutionary Student Movement (RSM) was behind the protest.

“We feel that these ideas have no place on our campus and refuse to legitimize them by allowing them space to organize,” a representative for the RSM wrote in an email to the paper. “As was demonstrated, campus security will not protect our community from events that are harmful to men, women, and trans people in the community, so we decided to stand up for what we feel is right.”

Hold on — ideas have no place on campus? Surely, they can’t be serious.
Alas, the irony of unilaterally deciding “what is right” is apparently lost on this vocal group of freedom fighters. Indeed, they haul out the notion of “safe space,” which is commonly used as a defence for quieting speakers that the loudest few on campus don’t want to hear. And they take it upon themselves to “protect” the apparently feeble campus community from the perils of intellectually challenging ideas.
The same shoddy rationale was employed by protesters at Massachusetts’ Brandeis University, which was recently pressured into forgoing plans to award an honourary degree to women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Ali’s personal history is a remarkable testament to resilience — she was genitally mutilated at age five and became a refugee to flee an arranged marriage, yet still rose to become a distinguished member of Parliament, public speaker and author. But her ongoing criticism of Islam, which she has called “imbued with violence,” was deemed “hateful” by a self-appointed group of safe-space-keepers at Brandeis University, and the administration shamefully caved to their demands and revoked their invitation. Rex Murphy summed up the miserable picture in his weekend column, asking, “Is this what Western thought and philosophy at the university has come to — setting up intellectual quarantines lest the immature and frightened be made uncomfortable or to feel unwelcome? Is this university or daycare?”
At the University of Ottawa, where protesters resorted to clapping, yelling and blowing a horn to drown out professor Fiamengo’s speech on rape culture and men’s issues, the answer is self-evident. The case could be made that Fiamengo’s rejection of rape culture, for example, is unhelpful to efforts to help victims of campus violence come forward, but just because protesters attempt to drown out her ideas doesn’t mean they’re not still there. They are — and they have been left unchallenged — because the Revolutionary Student Movement would rather bang on their desks in a futile, overgrown temper tantrum than actually refute her argument with contrary views.
Much ink has been spilled on the notion that contemporary young girls are reluctant to call themselves feminists, a term that they associate with angry, bra-less man-haters of their mother’s or grandmother’s generation. The foolish antics by protesters at the University of Ottawa don’t help to dispel that characterization. If the new women’s movement is about shutting down critical discussion about both men and women, it can count out a whole slew of supporters right now. The protesters at the University of Ottawa buried their message in their behaviour, which was juvenile, counterproductive and thoroughly embarrassing. And if they’re not embarrassed, I am on their behalf.
Source»

imminentdeathsyndrome:

The German term Fremdscham describes a type of proxy-embarrassment; it’s the feeling of shame you have on behalf of others, often those who don’t realize they should be embarrassed for themselves. I can’t think of a term that better applies to the scene that unfolded at the University of Ottawa two weeks ago.

Professor Janice Fiamengo had planned to speak on men’s issues and rape culture as part of a talk organized by the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE). The lecture, called “What’s Equality Got To Do With It? Men’s Issues and Feminism’s Double Standards,” was intended to dispel the notion of rape culture, according to Fiamengo, as well as discuss issues such as suicide by young men and custody rights after divorce. But some student activists decided Fiamengo’s lecture was not appropriate, so they took it upon themselves to shut it down.

The entire display is chronicled in a 50-minute YouTube video that shows protesters booing, yelling and blowing a vuvuzela throughout Fiamengo’s attempted address. The lecture organizer tried to reason with protesters, but it didn’t work. Campus security tried to intervene, with little success. Finally, the event moved to another room, but shortly after, the fire alarm went off.

According to the student newspaper the Fulcrum, a group that calls itself the Revolutionary Student Movement (RSM) was behind the protest.

We feel that these ideas have no place on our campus and refuse to legitimize them by allowing them space to organize,” a representative for the RSM wrote in an email to the paper. “As was demonstrated, campus security will not protect our community from events that are harmful to men, women, and trans people in the community, so we decided to stand up for what we feel is right.”

Hold on — ideas have no place on campus? Surely, they can’t be serious.

Alas, the irony of unilaterally deciding “what is right” is apparently lost on this vocal group of freedom fighters. Indeed, they haul out the notion of “safe space,” which is commonly used as a defence for quieting speakers that the loudest few on campus don’t want to hear. And they take it upon themselves to “protect” the apparently feeble campus community from the perils of intellectually challenging ideas.

The same shoddy rationale was employed by protesters at Massachusetts’ Brandeis University, which was recently pressured into forgoing plans to award an honourary degree to women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Ali’s personal history is a remarkable testament to resilience — she was genitally mutilated at age five and became a refugee to flee an arranged marriage, yet still rose to become a distinguished member of Parliament, public speaker and author. But her ongoing criticism of Islam, which she has called “imbued with violence,” was deemed “hateful” by a self-appointed group of safe-space-keepers at Brandeis University, and the administration shamefully caved to their demands and revoked their invitation. Rex Murphy summed up the miserable picture in his weekend column, asking, “Is this what Western thought and philosophy at the university has come to — setting up intellectual quarantines lest the immature and frightened be made uncomfortable or to feel unwelcome? Is this university or daycare?”

At the University of Ottawa, where protesters resorted to clapping, yelling and blowing a horn to drown out professor Fiamengo’s speech on rape culture and men’s issues, the answer is self-evident. The case could be made that Fiamengo’s rejection of rape culture, for example, is unhelpful to efforts to help victims of campus violence come forward, but just because protesters attempt to drown out her ideas doesn’t mean they’re not still there. They are — and they have been left unchallenged — because the Revolutionary Student Movement would rather bang on their desks in a futile, overgrown temper tantrum than actually refute her argument with contrary views.

Much ink has been spilled on the notion that contemporary young girls are reluctant to call themselves feminists, a term that they associate with angry, bra-less man-haters of their mother’s or grandmother’s generation. The foolish antics by protesters at the University of Ottawa don’t help to dispel that characterization. If the new women’s movement is about shutting down critical discussion about both men and women, it can count out a whole slew of supporters right now. The protesters at the University of Ottawa buried their message in their behaviour, which was juvenile, counterproductive and thoroughly embarrassing. And if they’re not embarrassed, I am on their behalf.

Source»

lovelywaifu:

typette:

the-milk-eyed-mender:

ampvee:

toasty-coconut:

thebittercherry:

toasty-coconut:

I see a lot of people talk about Skype since it’s probably one of the biggest instant messaging systems around the world. Though, I’m surprised more people don’t talk about…

Keeping this for later!

>No Linux client

davyjr:

dodie-snk:

HE’S SO STUPID HE CAN’T SCRATCH HIMSELF WITHOUT FALLING DOWN THAT’S CUTE

omg im in the worst mood and this cheered me up sooo much

kimikomuffin:

ok I was going to reblog this anyway
and then the one in the middle

kimikomuffin:

ok I was going to reblog this anyway

and then the one in the middle